You are here: Home Types of Garden Beds

Types of Garden Beds

Traditional Garden Bed

Garth planted his garden at the back of his house by the lawn. It is not raised in any way.

Traditional Garden Bed

Raised Garden Beds

Don’s garden area is a tiered series of raised beds. They are varying sizes but in long neat rows with plenty of walking space in between. They are surrounded by cinder blocks and filled with soil. Harvesting the vegetables is fairly easy because of the set up.

Raised bed Garden Overall

Raised bed Garden Overall

Raised Bed/Traditional Bed – Mixed

The west side of Elisha’s garden is raised bed for the tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, peppers etc. The east side of the garden is traditional gardening for the corn, peas, beans, squash etc.

Mixed traditional and raised bed examples

Mixed traditional and raised bed examples

Tunnel Garden in raised bed

Andrew is using a tunnel garden in his raised beds this year. The tunnel garden consists of aluminum tube hoops that arch over the planted area. They are covered with plastic and help to protect the plants and keep the moisture in. Andrew had plastic over the hoops but the wind blew them off. He will be replacing the plastic.

Tunnel Garden with raised bed

Tunnel Garden with raised bed

Modified Square Foot Garden Beds

Melinda decided to use raised beds because there are so many rocks in her garden area. She started out with square foot gardening. Her raised beds were 3 feet by 3 feet square. She decided this year that it was a lot of wasted space so two of the squares were joined together to make a 3 foot by 12 foot rectangle. They are built with cinder blocks, lined with landscaping plastic and filled with a mixture of top soil, bagged garden soil, peat moss, vermiculite and manure.

Modified square foot garden are built with cinder blocks

Modified square foot garden are built with cinder blocks

Modified square foot garden are built with cinder blocks

Mound Garden Beds

The mound areas are bordered by rocks or wood to hold the soil in place. The mounds are approximately eight inches to one foot deep. The larger ones have a board walkway through the center to make access easier.
Richard has divided the main part of the mound garden into thirds. He rotates the crops within these thirds so that the same type of plant is only in a given area every three years. This gives the specific nutrients for specific plants time to rejuvenate before the plant is in that area again.

The areas that are farthest to the east and southeast are for plants that have a tendency to spread out a lot. (i.e. squash)
Richard has a new area, by his wood pile, that he will be planting potatoes in this year.

Overall of mound garden bed

Overall of mound garden bed

close up of mound garden bed

close up of mound garden bed

close up of mound garden bed

Homemade Greenhouse

McKay & Traci have used a homemade greenhouse for their garden this year. The outer frame is built out of 2×4 planks on the top and bottom and metal fence posts. The walls are made with the 2x4s on the top and the bottom. These have been wired to the metal fence posts, which are placed 8 feet apart. This has all been covered with a 6 mil plastic. The front, or east, wall is 45 inches high. The back, or west wall, is 60 inches high. The north end has a hinged sheet of plywood that can be opened for access to the garden. Running along the top of the back, or west side, is a roll of reinforced 6 mil plastic. This was rolled forward to the east wall, over additional 2×4 planks, to completely cover the garden area to protect it.
The garden was planted in early march. The plastic did a good job until the heavy snowfall, in the spring, which broke the additional 2×4 planks. The plastic must have done its job well though because the garden is doing very well and is quite advanced. (The arched formation seen in the pictures is something that was given to McKay & Traci at a later time and has not been used yet).

During the garden club tour of the gardens it was discussed that green house plastic would probably hold up better than the plastic used here, and probably be less expensive in the long run.

North side of greenhouse

back side of green house

reinforced plastic

front of greenhouse

South side of greenhouse